Click here for fast information :Home | Siemens | AllenBradley/Rockwell | Mitsubishi | SCADA |Training | PLC Communications | Emergency Support | Vision Software | contact us

MR Control Ltd

Unit 5, Avonbank    Industrial Estate,
West Town Road,
Avonmouth
Bristol BS11 9DE
Tel: 0117 982 6608
Fax: 0117 982    6668

Click Here to Contact MR Control



(c) 2001-2003
This document has been converted from Word 97 (which has not done a perfect job) but this may give you an idea of our Allen Bradley Rockwell training

 

Training Notes on Allen Bradley

PLC5 & SLC 500

(DOS)

Contents

Section 1 Document History *

Section 2 Allen Bradley PLC5 and SLC 500 Training *

2.1 Introduction *

2.2 What is a PLC? *

2.3 Example PLC5 Layout *

2.4 SLC 500 example Layout *

2.5 Another Example PLC Layout *

Section 3 PLC 5 Programming *

3.1 Programming Software *

3.2 Starting the Programming Software *

3.3 Keyboard Notes *

3.4 Program Structure *

3.4.1 File 2 *

3.4.2 Passing Parameters *

3.4.3 Data *

3.5 Ladder *

3.6 Editing in the PLC *

Section 4 Memory Types *

4.1 PLC 5 Datatype Addressing *

4.1.1 Digital Inputs *

4.1.2 Digital Outputs *

4.1.3 Digital Bits *

4.1.4 Timers *

4.1.5 Counters *

4.1.6 Other Addressing *

4.2 SLC 500 Datatype Addressing *

4.2.1 Digital Inputs *

4.2.2 Digital Outputs *

4.2.3 Digital bits (Both PLC5 and SLC 500) *

4.2.4 Timers (both PLCs) *

4.2.5 Counters *

4.2.6 Other Addressing *

4.3 PLC 5 Datatype limitations *

4.4 Useful System PLC5 Memory Areas *

4.5 Useful System SLC 500 Memory Areas *

Section 5 Using the Programming Software *

5.1 Introduction *

5.2 Creating a New Program *

5.3 Initiating a new PLC *

5.4 Creating/Editing a Ladder internal File *

5.5 Adding a Ladder rung *

5.6 Copying a rung from another rung *

5.7 Deleting a Segment *

5.8 Data Monitor - To display data on-line *

Section 6 Simple PLC Editing *

Section 7 Searching *

7.1 Overview *

7.2 Searching in ladder mode *

7.2.1 PLC 5 Search screen *

7.2.2 SLC 500 Search screen *

7.3 Search Limitations *

7.4 Displaying Live Ladder Information *

7.5 Force Variables *

Section 8 Processor Status and Clearing Faults *

8.1 Clearing Major faults: *

8.1.1 PLC 5 status *

8.2 SLC 500 Processor Status *

8.3 Clearing Faults *

Section 9 Starting and Stopping the PLC *

9.1 Starting the PLC *

9.2 Stopping the PLC *

Section 10 Timers *

10.1 Timer Boxes *

10.2 Timer Presets *

10.3 Timer Types *

Section 11 Counters *

11.1 Count Up Counter *

11.2 Retentive Counters *

Section 12 Analogue Inputs *

12.1 PLC 5 Introduction *

12.2 PLC 5 BTR Parameters *

12.3 PLC 5 Data File Parameter *

12.4 PLC 5 Analogue Input BTW *

12.5 BTW Data Usage *

12.6 SLC 500 Analogue Inputs *

Section 13 Analogue Outputs *

13.1 PLC 5 Introduction *

13.2 PLC 5 BTW Parameters *

13.3 PLC 5 BTW Data Usage *

13.4 SLC 500 Analogue Outputs *

Section 14 EPROM Programming *

14.1 EPROM Types *

Section 15 Fault Finding *

15.1 Introduction *

15.2 LEDs *

Section 16 Documentation *

16.1 Introduction *

Section 17 Backing up and Restoring the PLC Program *

17.1 Backing up the PLC *

17.2 Restoring the PLC program *

Section 18 Cross Reference and Reports *

18.1 Generating a report *

18.2 Viewing/Printing Reports *

Section 19 Comparison with Other PLCs *

19.1 Mitsubishi Timers *

19.2 Mitsubishi Counters *

19.3 Siemens Timer Types *

19.3.1 SP 'Pulse' Timer *

19.3.2 SE 'Extended Pulse' Timer *

19.3.3 SD (SR) 'On Delay' Timer *

19.3.4 SS 'Latched On Delay' Timer *

19.3.5 SF 'Off Delay' Timer *

19.3.6 Back to Back timers *

19.4 I/O Descriptions *

Appendix 1 - Abbreviations Used *

Appendix 2 - Y2K Compatibility *

 

 

 

Section 1 Document History

 

 

 

Revision

Comments

Date

0.0

Initial Writing

Filename AB-TR-01.WP

10 March 1999

1.0

Initial Client Issue

Filename AB-TR-04.WP

11 March 1999

1.1

Update to include SLC 500 series

Filename AB-TR-06.DOC

9 November 1999

1.2

Minor modifications

Filename AB-TR-07.DOC

15th may 2000

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

Section 2 Allen Bradley PLC5 and SLC 500 Training

2.1 Introduction

This document details training information for Allen Bradley PLC 5 PLCs using 6200 Programming Software. Also included is information about the SLC 500 series.

 

2.2 What is a PLC?

A PLC (Programmable Logic Controller) is effectively a computer with I/O. The I/O (input/output modules) are a method of getting signals from the outside world into the computer and back again. The I/O are generally robust (so they can cope with noise and spikes). Also available are intelligent I/O cards (which effectively have a computer on the I/O card) and communication cards (which talk to other computers and graphic systems).

Allen Bradley PLCs are among the top selling PLCs around the world. They are very reliable and robust PLCs.

There are two main series of PLCs. The larger PLCs are called the "PLC 5" series and the smaller PLCs are called the "SLC 500" series. While the PLCs have different amounts of memory and varying speed the main reason for choosing the type of PLC is the amount of I/O required on the project.

2.3 Example PLC5 Layout

This diagram shows a typical PLC 5 rack layout.

 




+------------------------------------------+

                               

 P  C I I I I I I I I I        

 S  P / / / / / / / / /        

 U  U O O O O O O O O O        

                               

                               

                               

                               

+------------------------------------------+



 

The abbreviations are explained in this table:

Abbreviation

Description

PSU

Power Supply Unit

CPU

Central Processor Unit

I/O

I/O cards

The PSU supplies power for the PLC system. The CPU is the brains behind the system, and contains the ladder program. The I/O cards are the interface to the outside world.

2.4 SLC 500 example Layout

 

 




+-------------------+

               

  P    C I I I 

  S    P / / / 

  U    U O O O 

               

               

               

               

+-------------------+

These computer cards are normally wider but shorter than the PLC 5 series.

 

2.5 Another Example PLC Layout




      CPU

    (ladder)             AI              ETHERNET    I/O LINK

      CARD          <---CARDS--->AO       CARD         CARDS

   +--------------------------------------------------------+

                                            

                                            

                                            

                                            

                               ++           

                                          

                                          

                               ++           

                                            

     ++                        ++           

                                        

                                        

     ++                        ++           

   +--------------------------------------------------------+

                                              	

Section 3 PLC 5 Programming

 

3.1 Programming Software

This document trains personnel specifically in the following version of programming software for the PLC 5:


+------------------------- PLC-5 PROGRAMMING SOFTWARE -------------------------+

                                                                              

                        A 6200 Series Software Product                        

                                                                              

               Copyright 1986, 1994, Allen-Bradley Company, Inc.              

                             All Rights Reserved                              

                                                                              

                                 Release 5.0                                  

                                                                              

    This software is licensed to:  Company    JACOBS BAKERY LTD               

                                   Location   SITE ELECTRICAL DEPARTMENT      

                                              LONG LANE, AINTREE, LIVERPOOL   

                   Serial Number:                                             

------------------------------------------------------------------------------

 Wed Mar 10, 1999                                                 9:44:05 am  

------------------------------------------------------------------------------

 Terminal Address:77       Current Device: 1784-KT (DH+)       PLC Address:2  

+------------------------------------------------------------------------------+



and this SLC 500 programming software


+------------ SLC-500 ADVANCED PROGRAMMING SOFTWARE ---- RELEASE 6.01  --------+

                                                                              

             Rockwell Software Incorporated, Copyright 1989-1995              

                                                                              

                                 9323 - PA2E                                  

                                                                              

                             All Rights Reserved                              

                                                                              

                                                                              

      This software is licensed to:                                           

                                     The JACOBS BAKERY Ltd                    

                                                                              

                                                                              

------------------------------------------------------------------------------

 Thr Nov 18, 1999         Current Offline File: 2819F1            9:34:41 am  

------------------------------------------------------------------------------

   TERM Address:N/A  Current Device:Full-Duplex              PROC Address:N/A 

+------------------------------------------------------------------------------+

Some information for the previous versions is also included here.

 

3.2 Starting the Programming Software

This section details how to start the programming software on the PC.

Step

Description

1

Turn on the programmer/PC

2

Move to the IPDS directory

cd \IPDS

3

Start the software

ABMENU

This should give a menu selection for the various PLC packages on your PC

4

If this doesn't work try (for the PLC 5):

cd\ipds\attach\plc5

it

and this for the SLC 500:

cd\ipds\attach\slc500

ap

 

 

3.3 Keyboard Notes

Usually function keys F1 to F10 are used for all functions. The other important keys are:

ENTER (accept)

ESC (abort)

 

3.4 Program Structure

These PLCs can use a block structure. If used correctly this can be a great aid to structuring your programs in a modular manner. This may sound like jargon but effectively it means you can simplify your programs to aid maintenance by personnel other than the programmer.

Basic Example of Ladder File Layout:

%T%P PROGRAM DIRECTORY FOR PROCESSOR: V5TEST %P%P%P%P%P%P%P%P%P%P%P%P%P%P%P%P%P%P%P%P%P%P[ OFFLINE ]%P%P%P%W

%Q File Name Type Size(words) %Q

%Q──────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────%Q

%Q 0 system 10 %Q

%Q 1 undefined 6 %Q

%Q 2 ladder 7 %Q

%Q %Q

%Q %Q

%Q %Q

%Z%P%P%P%P%P%P%P%P%P%P%P%P%P%P%P%P%P%P%P%P%P%P%P%P%P%P%P%P%P%P%P%P%P%P%P%P%P%P%P%P%P%P%P%P%P%P%P%P%P%P%P%P%P%P%P%P%P%P%P%P%P%P%P%P%P%P%P%P%P%P%P%P%P%P%P%P%P%P%]

 

The block structure has great advantages for large programs but is still beneficial for smaller PLCs.

These are the types of Ladder Files:

File

Description

2

Main Starting Block (normally)

3

subroutines

 

When the PLC powers up it will normally run block 2 (it can run other blocks but this is very rare).

A larger example:

%T%P PROGRAM DIRECTORY FOR PROCESSOR: D1_BM1E %P%P%P%P%P%P%P%P%P%P%P%P%P%P%P%P%P%P%P%P%P[ OFFLINE ]%P%P%P%W

%Q File Name Type Size(words) %Q

%Q──────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────%Q

%Q 0 D1_BM1B system 182 %Q

%Q 1 17Sep1996 undefined 4 %Q

%Q 2 Main ladder 69 %Q

%Q 3 Startup ladder 5 %Q

%Q 4 General ladder 47 %Q

%Q 5 Spare ladder 5 %Q

%Q 6 Station6 ladder 56 %Q

%Q 7 UpperLower ladder 202 %Q

%Q 8 TEBelt ladder 81 %Q

%Q 9 StorageB1 ladder 64 %Q

%Q 10 StorageB2 ladder 62 %Q

%Q 11 StorageB3 ladder 62 %Q

%Q 12 StorageB4 ladder 57 %Q

%Q

%Z%P%P%P%P%P%P%P%P%P%P%P%P%P%P%P%P%P%P%P%P%P%P%P%P%P%P%P%P%P%P%P%P%P%P%P%P%P%P%P%P%P%P%P%P%P%P%P%P%P%P%P%P%P%P%P%P%P%P%P%P%P%P%P%P%P%P%P%P%P%P%P%P%P%P%P%P%P%P%]

 

3.4.1 File 2

This block can control the calling of other blocks - the best programs are laid out with just calls to other blocks in File 2

 

Startup Control

%Q Startup %Q

%Q Control %Q

%Q % JSR───────────────% %Q

%_─────────────────────────────────────────────────────────%$JUMP TO SUBROUTINE%─%b

%Q %Prog file number 3% %Q

%Q %Input parameter % %Q

%Q %Return parameter % %Q

%Q %──────────────────% %Q

General Control

%Q General %Q

%Q Control %Q

%Q % JSR───────────────% %Q

%_─────────────────────────────────────────────────────────%$JUMP TO SUBROUTINE%─%b

%Q %Prog file number 4% %Q

%Q %Input parameter % %Q

%Q %Return parameter % %Q

%Q %──────────────────% %Q

 

Here, Ladder File 3 and 4 are called consecutively. File 3 contains details of line Startup and file 4 contains general control information.

Always use low numbers for ladder files first as each file which is blank (even when it is not used or even configured) takes up memory.

3.4.2 Passing Parameters

Subroutines can pass parameters. This is detailed in the advanced course. On Allen Bradley PLCs this is not often used but can be very powerful when used correctly.

 

3.4.3 Data

Data areas are a very important part of the PLC program. These contain obvious items like setpoints and timers but also the inputs and outputs (both analogue and digital).

 

 

 

3.5 Ladder

 

Ladder looks like this:

BM1 Start Validation Control

============================

PC CHECK PART 1

%Q PEC %PEC %PEC %TEB DSB/TEB %Q

%Q PULL NOSE %LOWER %UPPER %Loading conveyors %Q

%Q OK FROM %STORAGE %STORAGE %End empty %Q

%Q ST.6 %BELT %BELT. EXIT%Photocell %Q

%Q %(EXIT) %(off=full)% %Q

%Q I:002 I:002 I:002 I:003 B3 %Q

%_────] [────────] [────────] [────────] [──────────────────────────────( )─────%b

%Q 07 12 13 00 200 %Q

 

 

 

A Timer rung looks like this:

 

Power on startup delay

%Q START %BM1 ON Validation %Q

%Q VALIDATION% On Time %Q

%Q delay %Q

%Q O:001 I:001 % TON───────────────% %Q

%_────] [────────] [──────────────────────────────────%$TIMER ON DELAY %─(EN)─%b

%Q 00 02 %Timer T4:10% %Q

%Q (4:6) (16:9) %Time base 0.01%─(DN) %Q

%Q %Preset 60% %Q

%Q %Accum 61% %Q

%Q %──────────────────% %Q

 

3.6 Editing in the PLC

Allen Bradley has a strange edit cycle - after editing you have to 'Test' the edits and then 'Accept' the edits. This is shortcut to:

F9, F8, F10, F8

This can be a bit annoying. It is designed to allow you to quickly test your edits and then abort them if they don't work. Very silly, rarely useful.

 

Section 4 Memory Types

These are the main types of PLC memory:

 

Type

Memory

Description

0

S

Processor System Area

1

I

digital inputs

2

O

digital outputs (letter O here!)

3

B

(Binary) Flag bits

4

T

Timers

5

C

Counters

6

R

Complex Instruction System Area

7

N

Integer

8

F

Floating Point

 

D

BCD (hex) data

 

Binary Flags (B) are generally used for digital information (but can easily be used for analogue information if required) and Integers (N) for Analogue Information. Data are retentive (ie they keep their data when the mains is switched off).

All files 9 and above can be configured as required. Note that you can delete file 8 and reinstate it as integer (and so on) but THIS IS A BAD IDEA so don't do it!

 

4.1 PLC 5 Datatype Addressing

All computer systems are very precise about syntax. This means you must type correctly!

4.1.1 Digital Inputs

Example Inputs addressing (octal)

I0/0

I32/7

I32/10

I32/17

Invalid Input addressing

I8/0

I9/0

I7/8

I0/9

I3/18

4.1.2 Digital Outputs

Example Outputs addressing (octal)

O0/0

OI32/7

OI32/10

O32/17

Invalid Output addressing

O8/0

O9/0

O7/8

O0/9

O3/18

4.1.3 Digital Bits

Example Bit Addressing:

B3:0/0 B3/0

B3:1/0 B3/16

B3:2/0 B3/32

B3:3/0 B3/48

Invalid Bit Addressing:

B3:0/16

B3:1/16

4.1.4 Timers

Example Timer Addressing

T4:0.PRE (preset value integer)

T4:0.ACC (current (accumulated) value integer)

T4:100/dn (expired bit)

T4:123/en (enabled bit)

T4:99/tt (enabled but not expired bit)

4.1.5 Counters

Example Counter Addressing

C5:0.PRE (preset value integer)

C5:0.ACC (current (accumulated) value integer)

C5:10/dn (Counter expired bit)

4.1.6 Other Addressing

System Area Addressing

R6:0 (more details in advanced course)

Integer area

N7:0 (integer addressed)

N7:0/5 (bit addressed)

N9:123/5 (bit addressed)

N11:123 (integer addressed)

Floating Points area

F8:0 (fp addressed)

F11:123 (fp addressed)

 

4.2 SLC 500 Datatype Addressing

4.2.1 Digital Inputs

Example Inputs addressing (octal)

I:0/0

I:32/7

I:32/10

I:32/17

Note the (very annoying) addition of the colon!

Invalid Input addressing

I0/0 (yes this is allowed on the PLC 5!)

I32/7

I32/10

I32/17

I8/0

I9/0

I7/8

I0/9

I3/18

And yes, it is extremely annoying that it's incompatible with the PLC 5 series!

4.2.2 Digital Outputs

Example Outputs addressing (octal)

O:0/0

O:32/7

O:32/10

O:32/17

More colons!

Invalid Output addressing

O8/0

O9/0

O7/8

O0/9

O3/18

O0/0

OI32/7

OI32/10

O32/17

4.2.3 Digital bits (Both PLC5 and SLC 500)

Example Bit Addressing:

B3:0/0 B3/0

B3:1/0 B3/16

B3:2/0 B3/32

B3:3/0 B3/48

Invalid Bit Addressing:

B3:0/16

B3:1/16

 

4.2.4 Timers (both PLCs)

Example Timer Addressing

T4:0.PRE (preset value integer)

T4:0.ACC (current (accumulated) value integer)

T4:100/dn (expired bit)

T4:123/en (enabled bit)

T4:99/tt (enabled but not expired bit)

4.2.5 Counters (both PLCs)

Example Counter Addressing

C5:0.PRE (preset value integer)

C5:0.ACC (current (accumulated) value integer)

C5:10/dn (Counter expired bit)

4.2.6 Other Addressing (both PLCs)

System Area Addressing

R6:0 (more details in advanced course)

Integer area

N7:0 (integer addressed)

N7:0/5 (bit addressed)

N9:123/5 (bit addressed)

N11:123 (integer addressed)

Floating Point area

F8:0 (fp addressed)

F11:123 (fp addressed)

 

4.3 PLC 5 Datatype limitations

There are some (but not many, compared to other PLCs) limitations on datatypes.

You can have one type of memory per block (ie you can have N9:0 but then cannot have B9:0, or vice versa).

The maximum data word number is generally limited to 1000 words per block, ie you can have N7:0 to N7:999 (100 words) but not N7:1000.

 

You can only create or delete data memory offline OR when the PLC is stopped (this is a real pain!).

SLC 500 Datatype limitations

The maximum data word number is limited to 256 words per block, ie you can have N7:0 to N7:255 (256 words) but not N7:256.

 

4.4 Useful System PLC5 Memory Areas

Address

Description

S:018

Real time clock (Year)

S:019

Real time clock (Month)

S:020

Real time clock (Day)

S:021

Real time clock (Hour)

S:022

Real time clock (Minutes)

S:023

Real time clock (Seconds)

4.5 Useful System SLC 500 Memory Areas

Address

Description

S:39

Real time clock (Year)

S:38

Real time clock (Month)

S:37

Real time clock (Day)

S:40

Real time clock (Hour)

S:41

Real time clock (Minutes)

S:42

Real time clock (Seconds)

Section 5 Using the Programming Software

5.1 Introduction

This section details a few of the most common editing facilities in the programming software.

 

5.2 Creating a New Program

This is the first step in setting up a PLC (as far as Software is concerned).

Step

Description

1

(From the Main Menu)

Offline

Configr

F4

2

Enter a Filename (eg JACOBS) and press ENTER

 

It should ask you to confirm a "NEW archive file"

3

You now have to enter the PLC type and revision and so on.

Check these against the PLC you have.

4

You will now have the basic file layout (page 6)

5

Ensure you are on File 2 (Ladder) and press

Monitor

File

F8

6

Now go to EDIT (F10) and insert a rung (F4) then insert an instruction (F4)

 

5.3 Initiating a new PLC

Often, when first programming a PLC, the memory will be corrupted. In this case you must delete the PLC memory as follows:

Step

Description

1

Clear Major Faults (Section 8)

2

Clear Minor Faults (Section 8)

3

Restore a Program (Section 17)

 

 

5.4 Creating/Editing a Ladder internal File

This allows you to create a new subroutine or block of software. To create a file do the following:

Step

Description

1

From the Program Directory (section 6)

2

F1 Proc Functions

3

F6 Create Lad Fl

4

Enter the number (use low numbers to save memory) and press enter

5

The ladder file should now appear

 

 

 

5.5 Adding a Ladder rung

To add a new rung

Step

Description

1

Press F10 Edit

2

Press F3 to append OR F4 to insert (note F3 will continue to append rungs)

5.6 Copying a rung from another rung

You can copy a rung only offline or when the PLC is stopped.

 

 

1

F10 Edit

2

F8 Advanced Editing

3

F1 to select the area to copy

4

F3 to COPY the area

5

Move to the area you want the copied rungs to go to

6

F4 Paste

 

 

5.7 Deleting a Segment

Step

Description

1

F10 Edit

2

Press F6 Delete Rung

Note that offline this will happen immediately, online it will require the test cycle.

 

 

 

5.8 Data Monitor - To display data on-line

This enables you to see the data being set while the program is running. Note this is available when offline or on-line.

 

Step

Description

1

F8 Data Monitor

2

F5 Specify Address

3

Select data type

 

 

Section 6 Simple PLC Editing

 

 

This is a very simple rung:

%Q BM1 Speed Bit %Q

%Q Control 16 %Q

%Q Line No5 %Q

%Q I:033 B114 %Q

%_────] [───────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────( )─────%b

%Q 04 52 %Q

To generate this rung do as follows:

 

1

F10 Edit

2

F4 insert rung

3

F4 insert instr(uction)

4

F1 XIC (eXecute if Closed, ie if the signal is ON then rung is performed)

5

Enter the address (I33/4 here)

6

F3 OTE (output control)

 

Enter the address (B114/52 here)

7

Press Enter until you see F10 Accept

8

F10 Accept

9

If you are online you will have to perform the test/accept cycle

Note that the text labels are configured via the "F5 Document" key.

 

Section 7 Searching

7.1 Overview

This powerful feature is very useful. SLC 500 searching similar but just that bit less user friendly.

7.2 Searching in ladder mode

This function applies equally to online and offline.

Step

Description

1

Press F6 Search

7.2.1 PLC 5 Search screen

The following screen should appear

%T%P Search %P%P%P%P%P%P%P%P%P%P%P%P%P%P%P%P%P%P%P%P%P%P%P%P%P%P%P%P%P%P%P%P%P%P%P%P%P%P%P%P%P%P%P%P%P%P%P%P%P%P%P%P%P%P%P%P%P%P%P%P%P%P%P%P%P%P%P%P%P%W

%Q F1 Search Type : SEARCH INST/ADDR Search Scope : GLOBAL %Q

%Q Search Direction : DOWN Search Wrap : ON %Q

%Q Search For : %Q

%Z%P%P%P%P%P%P%P%P%P%P%P%P%P%P%P%P%P%P%P%P%P%P%P%P%P%P%P%P%P%P%P%P%P%P%P%P%P%P%P%P%P%P%P%P%P%P%P%P%P%P%P%P%P%P%P%P%P%P%P%P%P%P%P%P%P%P%P%P%P%P%P%P%P%P%P%P%P%P%]

%Q I:000 B3 I:002 B3 %Q

%_──] [───] [───] [────────────────────────────────────────────────────────( )──%b

%Q 00 31 00 0 %Q

%Q %Q

%_────────────────────────────────[END OF FILE]─────────────────────────────────%b

%Q %Q

 

 

 

Press a function key for desired searching function or enter a search string.

(File 2: Rung 0)

Rem Prog Forces:None Edits:None 5/40 File JACOBS

Search Search Current Current Prev Instr Search Save

Type Instruc Operand String List Config Config

F1 F4 F5 F6 F7 F8 F9 F10

 

Check the information in bold type. This will stay the same after you change it, but if ti is wrong the search may not do what you want (ie you can search backwards, and also you can set it NOT to 'wrap' around when it gets to the bottom).

 

 

Enter what you want to search for and press F4 Search. Some examples of what you can search for:

You type

it searches for:

I0/0

first occurrence of input 0/0

xic q32/0

first occurrence of XIC q32/0

TON t4:0

TON instruction for timer T4:0

T4:0

first occurrence of timer 4:0 (ie TON, T4:0/dn etc.)

B3:0

first occurrence of any bits B3/0 to B3/15

N7:0

first occurrence of N7:0 or any bits N7:0/0 to N7:0/15

AFI

first occurrence of AFI instruction

SLC 500 searches are not quite as flexible.

 

7.2.2 SLC 500 Search screen

The following screen should appear

%T%P%P%P%P%P%P%P%P%P%P%P%P%P%P%P%P%P%P%P%P%P%P%P%P%P%P%P%P%P%P%P%P%P%P%P%P%P%P%P%P%P%P%P%P%P%P%P%P%P%P%P%P%P%P%P%P%P%P%P%P%P%P%P%P%P%P%P%P%P%P%P%P%P%P%P%P%P%P%W

%Q F1 Search Type : SEARCH INST/ADDR F7 Scope : GLOBAL %Q

%Q F2 Search For : F8 Direction : DOWN %Q

%Q F9 Wrap : ON %Q

%Z%P%P%P%P%P%P%P%P%P%P%P%P%P%P%P%P%P%P%P%P%P%P%P%P%P%P%P%P%P%P%P%P%P%P%P%P%P%P%P%P%P%P%P%P%P%P%P%P%P%P%P%P%P%P%P%P%P%P%P%P%P%P%P%P%P%P%P%P%P%P%P%P%P%P%P%P%P%P%]

%Q PLUSB PLUSB %Q

%Q I:1 I:1 % JSR───────────────% %Q

%_────]/[────────] [───────────────────────────────────────%$JUMP TO SUBROUTINE%─%b

%Q 160 160 %SBR file number 67% %Q

%Q (67:5) (67:5) %──────────────────% %Q

%Q STARTUP %Q

%Q % JSR───────────────% %Q

%_─────────────────────────────────────────────────────────%$JUMP TO SUBROUTINE%─%b

%Q %SBR file number 3% %Q

%Q %──────────────────% %Q

%Q % LES────────────────────% 2 %Q

%_─%$LESS THAN %─────────────────────────────────────────────(JMP)──%b

%Q %Source A STARTUPC.ACC% %Q

Press a function key

(file 2, rung 0)

offline no forces EDITS: NONE File 2819F1

SEARCH SEARCH START TOGGLE TOGGLE TOGGLE SAVE

TYPE FOR SEARCH SCOPE DIRECT WRAP CONFIG

F1 F2 F5 F7 F8 F9 F10

 

This is just that bit less friendly. to search, do the following:

Step

Description

1

Press F2 Search For

2

Enter the reference to search for (as above)

3

Press F5 Search

Other minor differences in the way it interprets variables are also present - just check the variable entered in the cyan "Search for" title at the top of the screen!

 

 

7.3 Search Limitations

All searching online is (rather oddly) done in the PLC itself. Some limitations and bugs are present in the searches of some PLCs. Some PLCs will NOT allow you to search for bits with an instruction, ie:

You can search for XIC I0/0 but NOT just every occurrence of I0/0

The bigger (more expensive) PLCs are much better.

Sometimes (on some PLCs) the search will get to the wrong place - normally the right place is just to the right, and another search will find it!

7.4 Displaying Live Ladder Information

Unlike other PLCs this is shown always when you are online. It is a bit slow to update however.

Normally "green" indicates the current is flowing and white means it isn't. If you have a black and white screen then get a colour one. The software works very badly in mono.

 

7.5 Force Variables

This page is used to force inputs and outputs while the PLC is running. It is normally done to 'fix' bad signals but GREAT CARE MUST BE TAKEN not to force E-stops for example!

 

Step

Description

1

Press F9 Force

3

Select inputs (F9) or outputs (F10)

4

Type a '1' to force on or a '0' to force off

5

PLC5:Press F6 Enable (F8 to confirm)

SLC 500:Press F7 Enable (F8 to confirm)

IMPORTANT NOTE:

Forced variables do NOT always appear to be forced in the ladder program - this can be very confusing!

To remove forces either :

PLC 5: F7 Disable (plus F8 to confirm)

SLC 500: F8 Disable (plus F8 to confirm)

or

F4 Remove All

Preferably BOTH!

 

 

 

Section 8 Processor Status and Clearing Faults

8.1 Clearing Major faults:

Major faults stop the PLC program (ie crash it!). Normally these require fault diagnostics and repair before resetting.

To clear processor faults on both PLC5 and SLC500:

Step

Description

1

F7 General utility

2

F2 Processor Status

This screen gives lots of information about the PLC, including the time and date.

8.1.1 PLC 5 status

Processor Status

Fault code: 0

Where faulted: 0:0

Major fault: 00000000 00000000

Minor fault 1: 00000000 00000000

2: 00000000 00000000

Processor status: 00000011 10001000 Mode switch in remote

27 20 17 10 7 0

I/O status btx full: 00000000 00000000 00000000

rack fault: 00000000 00000000 00000000

I/O control reset: 00000000 00000000 00000000

inhibit: 00000000 00000000 00000000

Arithmetic flags: S:0 Z:0 V:0 C:0

RTC date: 0000-00-00 RTC time: 00:00:00

Processor checksum: 0x0000 Indexed addressing offset: 0

EEPROM: TRANSFER ON BAD RAM Resident I/O chassis addr: 1-SLOT

Memory: UNPROTECTED Ram Backup: ENABLED

Press a function key, page up or page down, or enter a value.

S:12 =

Rem Prog Forces:ENABLED 5/40 File JACOBS

Proc Clear Clear

Config Min Flt Maj Flt

F2 F9 F10

 

 

 

8.2 SLC 500 Processor Status

EXT PROCESSOR STATUS 00000010 00001000 REAL TIME CLOCK DATE: 07-25-1900

EXT MINOR FAULT 00000000 00000000 TIME: 03:21.09

DISCRETE INPUT INTERRUPT

SUBROUTINE FILE: 0 MASK: 00000000

INPUT SLOT: 0 COMPARE VALUE: 00000000

ENABLED: 1 PRESET: 0

EXECUTING: 0 RETURN MASK: 00000000

PENDING: 0 ACCUMULATOR: 0

OVERFLOW: 0 LAST SCAN [ms]: 0

LOST: 0 MAX. SCAN [ms]: 0

PROCESSOR OPERATING SYSTEM USER PROGRAM

CATALOG #: 541 CATALOG #: 401 FUNCTIONAL TYPE: 1025

SERIES: B SERIES: A FUNCTIONAL INDEX: 35

REVISION: 3 F.R.N.: 5

USER RAM SIZE: 16

FLASH EEPROM SIZE: 512

Press a key or enter value, press Alt-H for help

S:37 =

offline forces DISABLED formatted decimal addr File 2819F1

PAGE PAGE GLOBAL SPECIFY NEXT PREV

UP DOWN STATUS ADDRESS FILE FILE

F1 F2 F4 F5 F7 F8

Note that there are several other pages..

8.3 Clearing Faults

As you see from both the above examples, the real time clock is completely wrong! Most of the PLCs are Millennium compatible (see appendix 2), but generally (apart from Jacob's 1D) the real time clock is not used.

To clear faults:

F9 Clear Minor Fault

F10 Clear Major Fault

Major faults are:

S:11/

Description

0

Bad User Program File

1

Illegal Operand Address

2

Programming Error

3

SFC Fault

4

Program Assembly Error

5

Powerup Protection Fault

6

Channel 3 Device Fault

7

User Generated Fault

8

Watchdog Timer Fault

9

Bad System Configuration

10

Hardware Error

11

MCP does not exist or is not ladder

12

PII does not exist or is not ladder

13

STI does not exist or is not ladder

14

Bad Fault Program

15

Non Ladder File

Some Minor PLC 5 Faults are:

 

S10/9

no MCP was configured to run

S10/6

Memory Cartridge battery low

S10/1

DH+ Table Changed

S10/0

Battery is bad or missing

S17/9

Duplicate node address

S17/7

Error not defined

Some useful PLC 5 Processor Status bits are:

 

S1/8

Forces Enabled

S1/9

Forces present

S1/11

Performing online programming

S1/15

1st scan of ladder program

Section 9 Starting and Stopping the PLC

9.1 Starting the PLC

WARNING! Ensure personnel are not working on the line since devices may start!

To Start the PLC:

Step

Description

1

Press F1 Mode

2

Select F3 Run Mode

3

Confirm with F8 Yes

 

 

9.2 Stopping the PLC

To Stop the PLC:

Step

Description

1

Press F1 Mode

2

Select F1 Program Mode

3

Confirm with F8 Yes

 

 

Section 10 Timers

10.1 Timer Boxes

A timer in Ladder format looks like this:

Power on startup delay

%Q START %BM1 ON Validation %Q

%Q VALIDATION% On Time %Q

%Q delay %Q

%Q O:001 I:001 % TON───────────────% %Q

%_────] [────────] [──────────────────────────────────%$TIMER ON DELAY %─(EN)─%b

%Q 00 02 %Timer T4:10% %Q

%Q (4:6) (16:9) %Time base 0.01%─(DN) %Q

%Q %Preset 60% %Q

%Q %Accum 61% %Q

%Q %──────────────────% %Q

SLC 500 timers are the same:

Flavour Screw B eye delay off.

%Q T4:120 I:1 % TOF───────────────% %Q

%_────] [──────] [────────────────────────────────────%$TIMER OFF DELAY %─(EN)─%b

%Q DN 165 %Timer T4:20%─(DN) %Q

%Q (4:12) %Time Base 0.01% %Q

%Q %Preset 600% %Q

%Q %Accum 600% %Q

%Q %──────────────────% %Q

 

The Parameters are explained below:

Parameter

Description

left part of rung

Timer Input Condition

"Timer"

Timer number (eg 10 in block T4 as above)

Time Base

number of seconds per 'preset, 0.01 seconds above

Preset

Timer preset value (in time base units, 0.6 seconds here)

Accum

Current timer value (in time base units 0.61 seconds here)

EN

Set if timer enabled

DN

Set if timer expired

The DN bit is then used as follows:

UPPER STORAGE BELT START OUTPUT

Loading (T4:21 & T4:25)

OR

unloading (B3/24)

%Q Run DSB %Upper %Power On %LOWER %Upper UPPER %Q

%Q for this %Storage %Delay On %STORAGE %STORAGE STORAGE %Q

%Q long when %Belt %Timer %BELT. %BELT. ???? BELT %Q

%Q row from %loading % %MOTOR %MOTOR START %Q

%Q Station 6 %from Stn 6% %OVERLOAD %OVERLOAD %Q

%Q T4:21 T4:25 T4:10 I:004 I:004 O:001 %Q

%_─────] [────────] [───────] [────────] [────────] [──────────────────( )─────%b

%Q TT DN DN 14 15 05 %Q

%Q (7:2) (7:0) (4:7) %Q

 

 

 

 

10.2 Timer Presets

 

The timebase is normally 0.01 seconds or 1 second. Choose 1 second when accuracy is not important (since it is more obvious what the timer is doing)

 

10.3 Timer Types

Whereas some PLCs have lots of different timer types, Allen Bradley only has 2, but then, this is all you need.

To generate a pulse timer:

%Q I:000 % TON───────────────% %Q

%_──] [───────────────────────────────────────────────%$TIMER ON DELAY %─(EN)─%b

%Q 00 %Timer T4:0% %Q

%Q %Time base 1.0%─(DN) %Q

%Q %Preset 5% %Q

%Q %Accum 0% %Q

%Q %──────────────────% %Q

%Q T4:0 O:000 %Q

%_──] [────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────( )──%b

%Q TT 00 %Q

%Q (2:0) %Q

 

This timer ensures that the output will be on for five seconds after the input comes on, and then go off again, ie:

 

 

% ─────────────────────────────────────────%

Input ───% %──────────

Timer Length <--------------->

% ───────────────%

Timer Output ───% %────────────────────────────────────

If the input goes off before the timer expires, the timer output goes off;

% ────%

Input ───% %───────────────────────────────────────────────

Timer Length <--------------->

% ────%

Timer Output ───% %───────────────────────────────────────────────

 

A delay timer is done as follows:

%Q I:000 % TON───────────────% %Q

%_──] [───────────────────────────────────────────────%$TIMER ON DELAY %─(EN)─%b

%Q 00 %Timer T4:0% %Q

%Q %Time base 1.0%─(DN) %Q

%Q %Preset 5% %Q

%Q %Accum 0% %Q

%Q %──────────────────% %Q

%Q T4:0 O:000 %Q

%_──] [────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────( )──%b

%Q DN 00 %Q

 

A minor difference in ladder, but very different in action:

When the input is on, the timer counts and when it expires, the timer output is on until the input goes off.

% ─────────────────────────────────────────%

Input ───% %──────────

Timer Length <--------------->

% ─────────────────────────%

Timer Output ───────────────────% %──────────

If the input goes off before the timer expires, the timer is completely reset and the output never comes on.

% ────%

Input ───% %───────────────────────────────────────────────

Timer Length <--------------->

Timer Output ────────────────────────────────────────────────────────

 

AB also supply retentive timers:

%Q I:000 % RTO───────────────% %Q

%_──] [───────────────────────────────────────────────%$RETENTIVE TIMER ON%─(EN)─%b

%Q 00 %Timer T4:1% %Q

%Q %Time base 1.0%─(DN) %Q

%Q %Preset 5% %Q

%Q %Accum 0% %Q

%Q %──────────────────% %Q

%Q I:000 T4:1 %Q

%_──] [───────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────(RES)─%b

%Q 01 %Q

 

The timer will count up as long as the input I0/0 is on. When it is off, unlike the other timer (TON) this RTO timer will just freeze. When I0/0 has been on for a total of 5 seconds here, no matter how much time it was off, the timer will have expired and the DN bit will be set.

The timer must be reset with the "RES" instruction to make it start again.

 

Section 11 Counters

There are two types of counters - count up and count down. Normally you will use a count up counter.

11.1 Count Up Counter

%Q I:000 % CTU───────────────% %Q

%_──] [───────────────────────────────────────────────%$COUNT UP %─(CU)─%b

%Q 00 %Counter C5:0% %Q

%Q %Preset 100%─(DN) %Q

%Q %Accum 0% %Q

%Q %──────────────────% %Q

%Q C5:0 O:000 %Q

%_──] [────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────( )──%b

%Q DN 00 %Q

%Q (2:2) %Q

 

This counter counts up every time a rising edge is seen on the input. When the counter reaches 100 here, the output is turned on.

 

Count down counters work in a similar manner.

11.2 Retentive Counters

Counters are always retentive.

Section 12 Analogue Inputs

 

12.1 PLC 5 Introduction

This is a brief overview of analogue inputs:

 

Analogue input cards require a BTR and sometimes a BTW instruction to configure them.

Read Analogue Input information

%Q BTR & BTW %Q

%Q Toggle %Q

%Q Timer 87 %Q

%Q T4:87 % BTR────────────────────% %Q

%_────] [────────────────────────────────────────%$BLOCK TRANSFER READ %─(EN)─%b

%Q DN %Rack 03% %Q

%Q (2:371) %Group 4%─(DN) %Q

%Q %Module 0% %Q

%Q %Control block B96:0%─(ER) %Q

%Q %Data file B108:1% %Q

%Q %Length 20% %Q

%Q %Continuous N% %Q

%Q %───────────────────────% %Q

 

12.2 PLC 5 BTR Parameters

The parameters used here are:

 

Rack

Physical Rack Number

Group

Group ie slot number in the rack

Module

Module number, this is either 0 or 1 (which depends on 'slot' addressing). If the required slot addressing is single then '0' is left hand and '1' is right hand, otherwise it is always '0'.

Control Block

Control data required (stores rack number etc, DO NOT CHANGE!)

Data File

Start address for data from AI module

Length

Length of data in Data file

Continuous

Sometimes No, but can be Yes, generally based on required speed of inputs and loading of CPU

 

 

 

12.3 PLC 5 Data File Parameter

This uses 20 words, as follows (into a B block here):

Data File

B108:

Description

1

Diagnostics

2

Data under range for channels 1-16

3

Data over range for channels 1-16

4

Polarity for channels 1-16

5

Channel 1 Value

6

Channel 2 Value

7

Channel 3 Value

8

Channel 4 Value

9

Channel 5 Value

10

Channel 6 Value

11

Channel 7 Value

12

Channel 8 Value

13

Channel 9 Value

14

Channel 10 Value

15

Channel 11 Value

16

Channel 12 Value

17

Channel 13 Value

18

Channel 14 Value

19

Channel 15 Value

20

Channel 16 Value

12.4 PLC 5 Analogue Input BTW

A corresponding BTW sets up the ranges:

Write Analogue Input scaling Information

%Q BTR & BTW %Q

%Q Toggle %Q

%Q Timer 88 %Q

%Q T4:88 % BTW────────────────────% %Q

%_────] [────────────────────────────────────────%$BLOCK TRANSFER WRITE %─(EN)─%b

%Q DN %Rack 03% %Q

%Q (2:372) %Group 4%─(DN) %Q

%Q %Module 0% %Q

%Q %Control block B106:0%─(ER) %Q

%Q %Data file B107:1% %Q

%Q %Length 37% %Q

%Q %Continuous N% %Q

%Q %───────────────────────% %Q

 

 

12.5 BTW Data Usage

This uses 37 words, as follows (into a B block here):

Data File

B107:

Description

1

Range type selection channels 1 to 8

2

Range type selection channels 9 to 16

3

Real time sampling, filter etc.

4

sign bits min scaling values channels 1-16

5

sign bits max scaling values channels 1-16

6

Channel 1 Minimum Scaling Value

7

Channel 1 Maximum Scaling Value

8

Channel 2 Minimum Scaling Value

9

Channel 2 Maximum Scaling Value

10

Channel 3 Minimum Scaling Value

11

Channel 3 Maximum Scaling Value

12

Channel 4 Minimum Scaling Value

13

Channel 4 Maximum Scaling Value

14

Channel 5 Minimum Scaling Value

15

Channel 5 Maximum Scaling Value

16

Channel 6 Minimum Scaling Value

17

Channel 6 Maximum Scaling Value

18

Channel 7 Minimum Scaling Value

19

Channel 7 Maximum Scaling Value

20

Channel 8 Minimum Scaling Value

21

Channel 8 Maximum Scaling Value

22

Channel 9 Minimum Scaling Value

23

Channel 9 Maximum Scaling Value

24

Channel 10 Minimum Scaling Value

25

Channel 10 Maximum Scaling Value

26

Channel 11 Minimum Scaling Value

27

Channel 11 Maximum Scaling Value

28

Channel 12 Minimum Scaling Value

29

Channel 12 Maximum Scaling Value

30

Channel 13 Minimum Scaling Value

31

Channel 13 Maximum Scaling Value

32

Channel 14 Minimum Scaling Value

33

Channel 14 Maximum Scaling Value

34

Channel 15 Minimum Scaling Value

35

Channel 15 Maximum Scaling Value

36

Channel 16 Minimum Scaling Value

37

Channel 16 Maximum Scaling Value

 

12.6 SLC 500 Analogue Inputs

These are totally incompatible with the PLC 5 series. It's all done with an SCP instruction.

An example is:

%Q LOADCELL Actual %Q

%Q INPUT Weight %Q

%Q %Q

%Q % LIM───────────────% % SCP────────────────────% %Q

%_─%$LIMIT TEST %───────────────────────────────%$SCALE W/PARAMETERS %─%b

%Q %Low Lim 3277% %Input I:4.1% %Q

%Q % % % 8196% %Q

%Q %Test I:4.1% %Input Min. 3277.000% %Q

%Q % 8196% % % %Q

%Q %High Lim 16384% %Input Max. 16384.00% %Q

%Q % % % % %Q

%Q %──────────────────% %Scaled Min. 0.000000% %Q

%Q I:4.1 - (5:0) % % %Q

%Q %Scaled Max. 272000.0% %Q

%Q % % %Q

%Q %Scaled Output F8:3% %Q

%Q % 116005.2% %Q

%Q %───────────────────────% %Q

The instruction SCP reads and scales the analogue input (which, in it's raw form is just another word of I/O). This particular AI is a 4-20mA and the raw data is scaled 3277 (4mA) up to 16384 (20mA). Here we have rescaled this to 0 to 272,000 engineering units.

 

Section 13 Analogue Outputs

 

13.1 PLC 5 Introduction

This is a brief overview of analogue outputs:

 

These use BTW instructions as before:

 

Analogue Output Card

====================

AO 1 = Main Drive Plant Speed (B111:1)

AO 2-4 = Spare (B111:2 to B111:4)

%Q BTR & BTW %Q

%Q Toggle Bit %Q

%Q B3 % BTW────────────────────% %Q

%_────]/[────────────────────────────────────────%$BLOCK TRANSFER WRITE %─(EN)─%b

%Q 1791 %Rack 03% %Q

%Q (2:424) %Group 6%─(DN) %Q

%Q %Module 0% %Q

%Q %Control block B110:0%─(ER) %Q

%Q %Data file B111:1% %Q

%Q %Length 5% %Q

%Q %Continuous N% %Q

%Q %───────────────────────% %Q

 

13.2 PLC 5 BTW Parameters

The parameters used here are:

 

Rack

Physical Rack Number

Group

Group ie slot number in the rack

Module

Module number, this is either 0 or 1 (which depends on 'slot' addressing). If the required slot addressing is single then '0' is left hand and '1' is right hand, otherwise it is always '0'.

Control Block

Control data required (stores rack number etc, DO NOT CHANGE!)

Data File

Start address for data from AI module

Length

Length of data in Data file

Continuous

Sometimes No, but can be Yes, generally based on required speed of inputs and loading of CPU

 

 

 

13.3 PLC 5 BTW Data Usage

This uses 5 words, as follows (into a B block here):

Data File

B111:

Description

1

Channel 1 Output Value

2

Channel 2 Output Value

3

Channel 3 Output Value

4

Channel 4 Output Value

5

Configuration Word

6

Channel 1 Minimum Range

7

Channel 1 Maximum Range

8

Channel 2 Minimum Range

9

Channel 2 Maximum Range

10

Channel 3 Minimum Range

11

Channel 3 Maximum Range

12

Channel 4 Minimum Range

13

Channel 4 Maximum Range

The configuration word can change the data format from integer (B or N type) to BCD (D type).

 

 

13.4 SLC 500 Analogue Outputs

These are very similar to SLC 500 analogue inputs, an example is:

%Q Start SPEED %Q

%Q Flag REFERENCE %Q

%Q %Q

%Q B3 % SCP────────────────────% %Q

%_────] [─────────────────────────────────────────────%$SCALE W/PARAMETERS %─%b

%Q 7 %Input N9:29% %Q

%Q (6:14) % 4989% %Q

%Q %Input Min. 0% %Q

%Q % % %Q

%Q %Input Max. 16384% %Q

%Q % % %Q

%Q %Scaled Min. 0% %Q

%Q % % %Q

%Q %Scaled Max. 32767% %Q

%Q % % %Q

%Q %Scaled Output O:4.1% %Q

%Q % 9974% %Q

%Q %───────────────────────% %Q

Here the output is scaled and written to with the SCP instruction.

Section 14 EPROM Programming

14.1 EPROM Types

 

EEPROMs are available on some CPUs. Usage is beyond the scope of this manual.

Section 15 Fault Finding

15.1 Introduction

As with all PLCs you are advised to back up regularly and often. It is always possible with any PLC to lose your program especially when learning a new PLC and your backups should be well up to date!

 

 

15.2 LEDs

The PLCs have red fault LEDs. When this is lit, the PLC will have stopped, so check the Major fault listing.

You can check major and minor faults through Processor Status (page 24).

Section 16 Documentation

16.1 Introduction

A simple phrase which applies to all PLC languages is to Tag everything! Every time you use a new bit, byte or word add a tagname at the same time. This will make everyone's job much easier in the long term.

 

All documentation is done through the "F5 Documnt" key.

Thereafter use the following keys:

Key

Description

F1 Rung Comment

Enter a rung comment

F3 Address Comment

Changing item comment

F6 Modify Symbol

Changing symbol for item

 

 

Section 17 Backing up and Restoring the PLC Program

17.1 Backing up the PLC

To back up the PLC program

 

1

F4 Program Directory

2

F2 Save/restore

3

Save

 

 

You may get a silly message which informs you the PLC is running and data may change. Simply press F8 to confirm

 

 

17.2 Restoring the PLC program

This is normally only done if the CPU has lost its' memory. The CPUs and I/O modules are very resilient and possibly the most reliable (in terms of hardware) of all the PLC manufacturers.

To restore a PLC program from Disk, first ensure the most up to date file is present on your PLC in the following directory:

\IPDS\ARCH\PLC5

 

 

 

1

F4 Program Directory

2

F2 Save/restore

3

Restore

You may get messages about different PLC types when you are loading a new CPU. This can normally be ignored (as long as you haven't used instructions not available on the CPU).

Section 18 Cross Reference and Reports

18.1 Generating a report

A cross reference can be generated for the PLC program:

Step

Description

1

(From Main menu) F8 reports

2

It's better to do them offline, so make sure a backup has been done

3

Select the filename if it is not correct (F4), then:

4

F3 Create Offline

5

Turn off all reports ("F4 Reset Reports")

6

Cursor down to Program Cross Reference and press "F3 Toggle Report"

7

Report and general options may have to be changed for specific printers

8

F1 Create Reports

This will create a report in the following directory:

\IPDS\LIS\PLC5

18.2 Viewing/Printing Reports

This file can then be printed or viewed as follows:

 

Step

Description

1

(From Main menu) F8 reports

2

F8 Print/view

3

cursor to required file

4

F3 Select

5

F10 to view, F1 to print

 

Section 19 Comparison with Other PLCs

 

19.1 Mitsubishi & Siemens Timers

The main difference here is the timers - Mitsubishi timers are like the Siemens SD timers (the AB TON timers). This simple 'failed to start timer'...

 

;Start pump 1 failed timer %

%Y430 K50 %

79 %─%$ %──────────────────────────────────────────────────────────────(T50 )%$

%RUN PUMP1 %

%PUMP1 START %

% TIMER %

% %

;alarm if pump fails to start %

%T50 X407 M74 %

82 %─%$ %───%$/%─%,──────────────────────────────────────────────────────( )──%$

%PUMP1 PUMP1% PUMP1 %

%START RUNNG% FAILD %

%TIMER % %

% % %

%M74 X411 % %

%─%$ %───%$/%─% %$

%PUMP1 PUMP1 %

%FAILD RESET %

...is the equivalent in Siemens of this:

SEGMENT 1 0000 (SD Timer)

! T 50

!Q 4.3 +-----+

+---] [---+-!T!-!0!

!KT 050.1 --!TV BI!-

! ! DE!-

! ! !

! ! !

! +-!R Q!-

! +-----+

SEGMENT 2 0009

!

!T 50 -I.KEYREM F 7.4

+---] [---+---]/[---+---------+---------+---------+---------+---------+--( )-!

! !

!F 7.4 -I.U15T !

+---] [---+---]/[---+

 

Mitsubishi timers have lower presets than Siemens Timers (ie Siemens can time a greater length than Mitsubishi PLCs).

19.2 Mitsubishi Counters

 

Mitsubishi counters are always count down.

 

 

19.3 Siemens Timer Types

There are five different timers in Siemens. You will normally use an SD (AB TON) timer, and often use an SP timer. You will rarely, if ever, use the other types of timers.

All the timers are described as follows:

19.3.1 SP 'Pulse' Timer

This is one of the two most commonly used timers (the other is the SD timer). When the input is on, the timer output is on until the timer expires when the timer output goes off;

% ─────────────────────────────────────────%

Input ───% %──────────

Timer Length <--------------->

% ───────────────%

Timer Output ───% %────────────────────────────────────

If the input goes off before the timer expires, the timer output goes off;

% ────%

Input ───% %───────────────────────────────────────────────

Timer Length <--------------->

% ────%

Timer Output ───% %───────────────────────────────────────────────

19.3.2 SE 'Extended Pulse' Timer

This timer goes on when the input goes on and remains on for a fixed time (ignoring the state of the input).

% ─────────────────────────────────────────%

Input ───% %──────────

Timer Length <--------------->

% ───────────────%

Timer Output ───% %────────────────────────────────────

If the input goes off before the timer expires, the timer output does not go off until the timer has expired;

% ────%

Input ───% %───────────────────────────────────────────────

Timer Length <--------------->

% ───────────────%

Timer Output ───% %────────────────────────────────────

19.3.3 SD (SR) 'On Delay' Timer

The SD timer is probably the most commonly used timer. This timer was called SR with older Siemens programming software and the abbreviation SR sometimes appears even in the latest software. When the input is on, the timer counts and when it expires, the timer output is on until the input goes off.

% ─────────────────────────────────────────%

Input ───% %──────────

Timer Length <--------------->

% ─────────────────────────%

Timer Output ───────────────────% %──────────

If the input goes off before the timer expires, the timer is completely reset and the output never comes on.

% ────%

Input ───% %───────────────────────────────────────────────

Timer Length <--------------->

Timer Output ────────────────────────────────────────────────────────

 

19.3.4 SS 'Latched On Delay' Timer

This timer goes on a fixed time after the input goes on (even if the input goes off again).

% ───────────────────────────%

Input ───% %────────────────────────

Timer Length <--------------->

% ──────────────────%

Timer Output ───────────────────% %─────────────────

% %

Timer Reset ─────────────────────────────────────%%───────────────

Note that this timer must be reset before it can start again. This is very similar to the AB RTO retentive timer.

If the input goes off before the timer expires, the timer output still comes on after the preset time.

% ────%

Input ───% %────────────────────────────────────────────

Timer Length <--------------->

% ─────────────────%

Timer Output ───────────────────% %───────────────

% %

Timer Reset ─────────────────────────────────────%%──────────────

 

19.3.5 SF 'Off Delay' Timer

This timer output comes on when the input comes on and goes off a fixed time after the input goes off.

% ──────%

Input ───% %─────────────────────────────────────────────

Timer Length <--------------->

% ──────────────────────%

Timer Output ───% %─────────────────────────────

19.3.6 Back to Back timers

To make two back to back timers (ie a pulse on-pulse off timer pair) use two SD timers:

SEGMENT 1 0000

! T 10

!T 11 +-----+

+---]/[---+-!T!-!0!

!KT 005.2 --!TV BI!-

! ! DE!-

! ! !

! ! !

! +-!R Q!-

! +-----+

T 10 = T.OnPls ON Pulse timer

SEGMENT 2 0009

! T 11

!T 10 +-----+

+---] [---+-!T!-!0!

!KT 005.2 --!TV BI!-

! ! DE!-

! ! !

! ! !

! +-!R Q!-

! +-----+

!

! :BE

T 10 = T.OnPls ON Pulse timer

T 11 = T.OffPls Off Pulse timer

The first timer (timer 10 here) controls the length of the off pulse and the second timer (timer 11) controls the length of the ON pulse. To use this in you program use the contact;

T10

-] [-

which will be on for 5 seconds every 10 seconds in the example above.

 

 

19.4 I/O Descriptions

Mitsubishi

Description

Siemens

ab

X

Digital Inputs

I (or E)

I

Y

Digital outputs

Q (or A)

O

M

Internal Flags

F (or M)

B

D

datawords

DW

N

T

Timers

T

T

C

Counters

C (or Z)

C

X

Analogue Inputs

PW or OW

D and N

Y

Analogue Outputs

PW or OW

D and N

M

System Flags

RS

S or R

The alternative letters for Siemens are for the German versions, which pop up now and again due to little bugs in the programming software.

Warning!

Do not use the Siemens System Flags (RS) unless you know exactly what you are doing!

 

Appendix 1 - Abbreviations Used

Description

AI

Analogue Input

AO or AQ

Analogue Output

C

Counter

CPU

Central Processor Unit

DO or DQ

Digital Output

DW

Dataword

EPROM

Erasable Programmable Read Only Memory

EEPROM

Electronically Erasable Programmable Read Only Memory

I

Single Digital Input

O or Q

Single Digital Output (letter O here!)

PLC

Programmable Logic Controller

PSU

Power Supply Unit

S

Processor System Area

T

Timer

Appendix 2 Y2K Compatibility

Allen Bradley known Y2K Issues

Product(s)

Issue/Note Description

1775-LP
1775-L1
1775-L2
1775-L3
1775-L4
1775-LPA

The PLC-3 will rollover and have an accurate leap year in power-up mode only. The PLC-3 clock function, during power down, will hold the time and date at its last value prior to power down (assuming the battery is capable of holding data). Upon re-application of power, the time and date will need to be re-set. The PLC-3 did not rollover or recognise leap year in power down mode prior to 1/1/2000 and will not after 1/1/2000. NOTE: The user program in the PLC-3 is completely backed by the battery.

1785-LT4
1785-LT3
1785-LT
1785-LT2
6008-LTV

The processors pass all the tests except leap year in powered down mode. The processor, if set to 2/28/2000 and powered down through the date change, will power up with 3/1/2000. If the power remains ON through the date change, the correct leap day is displayed. This is not unique to the Year 2000. Expanded tests shows the same results for 1988, 1992, and 1996. The important thing to remember is that this does not stop the processor from running unless the application code relies on the date for execution. There will be no fix for these processors.

5730-CPU1
5730-CPU2
5731-CPU2

The DEC MicroVAX is Year 2000 Ready, but you must have a Ready version of Open VMS. The versions of Open VMS that are Year 2000 Ready are 5.5-2, 6.2 or 7.1. If you do not have one of these versions, there are enhancement kits available to update your system from Digital. For information, please see their web site at www.digital.com

Industrial
Terminals &
Computers
(refer to
table)

This product will not roll over to the Year 2000 on its own. After 12/31/99 the date must be manually set on the computer. Once this is done, the computer will continue to recognise the proper date.
To manually set the date:
Turn on the computer. During the boot up process a notification for entering setup will appear. For example, "To enter setup press (F1)." On the T70/T60 workstations the notification will read, "press (ctrl, alt, esc) to enter setup." Enter setup during boot according to your computers directions. Once in setup, select the time and date option. Simply enter the new date and save the new settings.

Standard
PanelView Hardware (refer to
table)

If you are doing date comparisons:
PanelView date transfers to or from a controller may use a 2-digit year format. Internally, most controllers use a 4-digit year format. Considering this, user controller ladder logic should be examined to be sure date comparisons are performed correctly.
Please see the document Y2k.rss below:

Enhanced PanelView Hardware (refer to table)

If you are doing date comparisons:
PanelView date transfers to or from a controller may use a 2-digit year format. Internally, most controllers use a 4-digit year format. Considering this, user controller ladder logic should be examined to be sure date comparisons are performed correctly.

PanelBuilder
Software (refer to
table)

PanelBuilder software does not utilize the time or date in the software. The time and date stamping is done by the operating system. The PanelBuilder files save this information and display it in the format dictated by the operating system. Therefore PanelBuilder has no control when it comes to file saving and the year 2000.

1770-RG

The 1770-RG will rollover and have an accurate leap year in power-up mode only. The 1770-RG does not have battery backup which holds the time and date. When a power cycle occurs, the time and date are lost and need to be re-entered. The 1770-RG did not rollover or recognise leap year in power down mode prior to 1/1/2000 and will not after 1/1/2000.

1771-DMC

The 1771-DMC, 1, 4 does not roll over to the Year 2000. You must order new firmware.
To Order the Firmware upgrade, follow these steps:
1. Call 440-646-6800 (this is an automated answering system)
2. Remain on the line for assistance.
3. Request to order a set of firmware, number 1771-DMCU
-OR-
Send an e-mail to: racleasktheexpert@ra.rockwell.com
You MUST include ALL of the following information:
- Your Name
- Company Name
- Full mailing address (NO P.O. Box's)
- The firmware upgrade you are requesting: 1771-DMCU
***This firmware upgrade is free

1771-DSX

If 1771-DSX2, 4 is in power down mode on or after 12/31/99, when it is powered up, the date will not have properly rolled over from 12/31/99 to 1/1/2000. Upon powering up, the unit must be manually set to the current date. Once the date has been manually set after 1/1/2000, it will thereafter continue to recognise the proper date, including leap year dates.

If the 1771-DSX2, 4 is in power up mode on 12/31/99, it will properly roll over to 1/1/2000. However, the first time power is lost after 1/1/2000, the unit will lose the date. Therefore, upon powering up, the unit must be manually set to the current date. Once the date has been manually set after 1/1/2000, it will thereafter continue to recognise the proper date including leap year dates.

1336T Force

The 1336 Force does not recognise leap year. You must use drive tools to reset the date. The 1336 Force did not recognise leap year prior to 1/1/2000 and will not after 1/1/2000. The date function in the 1336 Force is only a 2 digit format.

1395
1396

The 1395/1396 will rollover and have an accurate leap year in power-up mode only. The 1395/1396 does not have battery backup which holds the time and date. When a power cycle occurs, the time and date are lost and need to be re-entered. The 1395/1396 did not rollover or recognise leap year in power down mode prior to 1/1/2000 and will not after 1/1/2000.

Medium
Voltage

Medium Voltage products are often customer engineered and have many components installed to meet specific customer/application needs. All MV products should be reviewed for components which may have a real time clock. Any such items should be investigated for Year 2000 Readiness. This can be done by contacting the component manufacturer or Rockwell Automation Medium Voltage Product Support personnel at
(519) 740-4100.

1785-O5E
1785-O5G

Map Manager software can only be run on 286/386 computers. Since the 286/386 computers are not Year 2000 Ready, this product will not be Year 2000 Ready.

6500-PS7TS/A

Install Patch Disk: For the ProSet 700 Patch files and instructions, please see our website at www.ragts.com/y2k and follow these steps:
1. Click "Downloads"
2. Click ProSet 700 Patch
3. Register with the appropriate information and "submit"
4. Follow the instructions given.

6500-PS600

Year 2000 Rollover Fix: For the ProSet 600 Year 2000 Rollover fix instructions, please see our web site at www.ragts.com/y2k and follow these steps:
1. Click "Downloads"
2. Click "ProSet 600 Rollover Fix"
3. Register with the appropriate information and "submit
4. Follow the instructions given.
NOTE: 6500-PS600 is a system composed of 2711-Kxxx, 1785-Lxxx and the ProSet 600 software. You must verify all pieces of this system for Year 2000 Readiness.

2755-DH5

The 2755-DH5 terminals hardware works correctly, but since it is programmed in
BASIC, there is a problem. The Real-Time Clock in the LINX terminals support a date up to the year 2084. This can be verified by terminating any program which is running in the terminal, enter the System Menu (#3) and entering a date such as 000101 (January 1, 2000). Then exit the menus and press the #3 key, you should see SAT JAN 1, 2000. However, when a LinxBASIC program performs the following statement:
d$ = Date$
d$ will equal "000101", on Jan 1, 2000
Therefore a LinxBASIC program which does not check to see if the year is less than 98 will run into problems if it uses the year for any calculations. For instance, if you were born in 1960, and if a LinxBASIC program does not correctly check the year, then you would be 60 year old in the year 2000, which is not correct. All LinxBASIC programs which uses the year for any type of calculation should be created as follows:
d$ = Date$
yr = Val (Left$ (d$, 2))
If yr < 98 Then yr = yr + 2000 Else yr = yr + 1900
This algorithm then correctly determines the year. So the internal clock does support year past 2000, but LinxBASIC only returns a two digit year.

2706-Bxxx

The DL20 has the prefix "19" hard coded for the print command. The internal clock only has 2 digits which is then attached to the hard coded "19". For example, in the year 2001, the DL20 will see the date as "01". However, when the date is printed of the printer port only, the date will read 1901. This is only seen from the printer port to a printer. All other uses of the clock will show month/day/year where the year will be shown as "01".

3100-DRC

Year is always handled with two digits. When the date is set by SETDAT, the date skips the leap day (not when set by CLI). The date can be set 00-02-29 by SETDAT or CLI on the leap day.

3100-DGC

Year is always handled with two digits. In the year 2000, the date skips over the leap day 29.2.2000; it cannot even be set from the keyboard. In other leap years, the leap day is29.2.2000; it cannot even be set from the keyboard. In other leap years, the leap day is handled properly.

3251-DMS2
3251-DMS3

The program displays the date in 2 digit format only. Printouts will only show a 2 digit year.

System Access Manager (SAM)

If using the ICOM Graphic Logistics package, certain graphics pages can not be compiled while running under VDOS. Pages compiled successfully under DOS.

2100-xxxxx

CENTERLINE Motor Control Centres are custom build for each customer. To determine Year 2000 Readiness of one of these products, the customer must provide us with the Catalogue No./Serial No. listed on the product. Please see the diagram below to locate where this information is on each machine. Once this information has been obtained, please call 414-382-2000 and ask for the Year 2000 Help Desk.

Nameplate Data
Each vertical section has a nameplate located on the vertical wireway door. On special width sections, the nameplate is located on the section door. See Figure 1.1. Information on nameplates include:
- catalogue number / serial number
- series letter of the section
- maximum bus bar voltage and current rating
- section location number
- Section Nameplate

1756-PLXC

ProcessLogix Release 200 (R200) will contain Windows NT 4.0 service pack 4. Service pack 4 fixes Microsoft bugs related to Year 2000 in the Internet Explorer and Networking areas. Rockwell Automation will be shipping ProcessLogix Release 200 in May 1999. Rockwell Automation has a migration plan for upgrading existing customers to ProcessLogix Release 200.

2711E-ND1
2711E-ND7

The following are known issues with the PanelView e File Transfer Utility 32 version 4.x and versions 5.00 to 5.12.

1) If the application to be downloaded has a date stamp on or after 1/1/2000, the "Download if newer" option in File Transfer Options dialog (activated by clicking on "Options" button on the toolbar or the "Download Options..." button) of the PanelView e Transfer Utility 32 does not function properly. The PanelView e Transfer Utility 32 will download the file, even if the file being downloaded is not newer than the PanelView terminal file.

2) In the PanelView e File Transfer Utility 32, the "Date Modified" field provided by the "Get Transfer Parameters From PV File" option in the "Parameters" menu will be incorrect for PVD files with dates of 1/1/2000 or later.

Automatic Software Upgrade to In-Support PanelBuilder 1400e Users by end of September 1999
A PanelBuilder 1400e Version 5.13.00 Y2K Upgrade Kit will be automatically sent to all in-support PanelBuilder 1400e (Catalogue No. 2711E-ND1) users. All registered out-of-support users will receive a notice of upgrade availability in September and may obtain an upgrade kit by renewing their support. The PanelBuilder 1400e Y2K Upgrade kit will include a CD-ROM with Version 5.13.00 PanelView e File Transfer Utility 32 that incorporates the fixes that resolve the issues listed above. The CD-ROM will also include the PanelBuilder 1400e and PanelView e Serial Firmware Upgrade Utility 32 that address issues #26 and #30. You may phone your local Allen-Bradley authorised distributor or Rockwell Automation Sales/Support office to renew your support.

2711E-ND1

In PanelBuilder 1400e Version 5.12 and earlier, dates on or after 1/1/2000 in printed reports will be formatted incorrectly with a leading "1" in the year field. For example, January 1, 2001 would print as "1/1/101" instead of "1/1/01".

Automatic Software Upgrade to In-Support PanelBuilder 1400e Users by end of September 1999
A PanelBuilder 1400e Version 5.13.00 Y2K Upgrade Kit will be automatically sent to all in-support PanelBuilder 1400e (Catalogue No. 2711E-ND1) users. All registered out-of-support users will receive a notice of upgrade availability in September and may obtain an upgrade kit by renewing their support. The PanelBuilder 1400e Y2K Upgrade kit will include a CD-ROM with Version 5.13.00 PanelBuilder 1400e that incorporates the fix that resolves the issue listed above. The CD-ROM will also include the PanelView e File Transfer Utility 32 and PanelView e Serial Firmware Upgrade Utility 32 that address issues #25 and #30. You may phone your local Allen-Bradley authorised distributor or Rockwell Automation Sales/Support office to renew your support.

2711-KA1
2711-KC1
2711-TA1
2711-TA4
2711-TC1
2711-TC4

If the terminal date of a PanelView 1200 has been set (via the terminal config screen or by the PLC) to a date on or after 1/1/2000, the day-of-the-week word sent to the controller when using the "Time and Date to PLC Controller" option will be incorrect. If the terminal rolls over from 12/31/1999 to 1/1/2000 on its own, the day-of-the-week value will remain correct. Only after a manual date change on or after 1/1/2000 will this error occur.

1403-MMxxx
1403-LMxxx

To Order the Firmware upgrade, follow these steps:
1. Call 440-646-6800 (this is an automated answering system)
2. Remain on the line for assistance.
3. Request to order the firmware upgrade for Powermonitor II.
**You will need to have the catalogue number and series/revision of the product you are currently using when you call.

8600 AT90
8600 IWS
8601 AT MC
8601 GP AT
10/Series

These products are no longer manufactured by Rockwell Automation, they are now a product of OSAI. Please refer to www.osai.co.uk/usa/y2k/products.shtml for information on the specific Y2K issues. All Year 2000 information and product upgrades are the responsibility of OSAI. However, if your company is located in the U.S. or Canada, OSAI has contracted with Rockwell Automation to provide upgrade services to customers in the U.S. or Canada.

Customers in the U.S. or Canada:
Please fill out CNC Request Form.dot attached below. When completed, please send the document to Brian Duchossois either in an e-mail to bkduchossois@ra.rockwell.comor via fax at 440-646-5568.



Customers outside of the U.S. and Canada:
Please contact OSAI directly:
Contact Name - Francesco Montanarella
Contact Phone - 39.011.9899726
Contact Fax - 39.011.9899725
Contact E-mail - montanarellaf@osai.it

2711-KC1MC
2711-TC1MC
2711-TC4MC
2711E-K10xx
2711E-T10xx
2711E-K12xx
2711E-T12xx
2711E-K14xx
2711E-T14xx

The trend object displays February 29, 2000 as March 1, 2000. The dates are displayed as follows:

(depending on 4-digit or 2-digit date format selected in terminal configuration)
Day 1: 2/28/2000 or 2/28/00
Day 2: 3/1/2000 or 3/1/00
Day 3: 3/1/2000 or 3/1/00
Day 4: 3/2/2000 or 3/2/00


All dates are correct except February 29, 2000 is displayed as March 1, 2000 - this is a display issue only. The trend data is still presented in the proper order and subsequent dates (including leap years) are displayed correctly.


Automatic Software Upgrade to In-Support PanelBuilder 1400e Users by end of September 1999
A PanelBuilder 1400e Version 5.13.00 Y2K Upgrade Kit will be automatically sent to all in-support PanelBuilder 1400e (Catalogue No. 2711E-ND1) users. All registered out-of-support users will receive a notice of upgrade availability in September and may obtain an upgrade kit by renewing their support. The PanelBuilder 1400e Y2K Upgrade kit will include a CD-ROM with Version 5.13.00 PanelView e Serial Firmware Upgrade Utility 32 that incorporates the fix that resolves the issue listed above. The CD-ROM will also include the PanelView e File Transfer Utility 32 and PanelBuilder 1400e that address issues #25 and #26. You may phone your local Allen-Bradley authorised distributor or Rockwell Automation Sales/Support office to renew your support.